“Twilight” Fans Represented in Commercial Paratexts and Inter-Fandoms: Resisting and Repurposing Negative Fan Stereotypes

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter explores how sound works along with filmic image in Hardwicke's Twilight, Weitz's New Moon, and Slade's Eclipse to position the viewer in relation to Bella's perspective. It concerns the uses of voiceover as Bella's narration, an area illuminated by French film scholar Michel Chion's work on cinematic sound. Comparing the opening sequences of Twilight and New Moon provides an initial entry into understanding how subjective-internal voiceovers function differently in the films. An understanding of each film's plot-especially how plots build on each other-is necessary prior to a consideration of the cinematic uses of voiceover since that sound feature contributes to Bella's interiority, particularly her motivation for actions in addition to her emotional perspective. In order to discern the varying functions and implications of Bella's voiceover in the 'Twilight' films, a consideration of scholarship that specifically takes into account how sound operates with film grammar is necessary.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationGenre, Reception, and Adaptation in the 'Twilight' Series
EditorsAnne Morey
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter7
Pages113-130
Number of pages18
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9781315584331
ISBN (Print)9781409436614, 9781138271593
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Mar 2012
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameStudies in Childhood, 1700 to the Present
PublisherRoutledge

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  • Cite this

    Hills, M. (2012). “Twilight” Fans Represented in Commercial Paratexts and Inter-Fandoms: Resisting and Repurposing Negative Fan Stereotypes. In A. Morey (Ed.), Genre, Reception, and Adaptation in the 'Twilight' Series (1st ed., pp. 113-130). (Studies in Childhood, 1700 to the Present). Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315584331