U.K.: More Country Ownership

Sam Sharpe, Adrian Wood, Ellen Wratten

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 2005, the UN Millennium Project recommended a doubling of aid flows worldwide from their recent levels of $60 billion per year. The Commission for Africa called for a doubling of aid to Africa over the next three to five years, and the Gleneagles G8 summit committed the major donors to achieving this target. But the impact of such increases in aid on world poverty will depend crucially on how they are spent. If a doubling of aid leads to a doubling of donor projects, missions, and bureaucracy, developing country administrations will collapse under the strain. But if it leads to a doubling of partner governments' own spending on infrastructure, education, health, HIV/AIDS, and social safety nets, we can be optimistic about achieving the MDGs.

LanguageEnglish
Pages36-38
Number of pages3
Volume42
No.3
Specialist publicationFinance and Development
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

ownership
aid
aid flow
bureaucracy
UNO
AIDS
health education
developing country
acquired immune deficiency syndrome
poverty
human immunodeficiency virus
infrastructure
health
developing world
safety
education
Africa
project
G8
world

Cite this

Sharpe, S., Wood, A., & Wratten, E. (2005). U.K. More Country Ownership. Finance and Development, 42(3), 36-38.
Sharpe, Sam ; Wood, Adrian ; Wratten, Ellen. / U.K. More Country Ownership. In: Finance and Development. 2005 ; Vol. 42, No. 3. pp. 36-38.
@misc{65ef9a608ddb4e21a2e069ffbd914ca9,
title = "U.K.: More Country Ownership",
abstract = "In 2005, the UN Millennium Project recommended a doubling of aid flows worldwide from their recent levels of $60 billion per year. The Commission for Africa called for a doubling of aid to Africa over the next three to five years, and the Gleneagles G8 summit committed the major donors to achieving this target. But the impact of such increases in aid on world poverty will depend crucially on how they are spent. If a doubling of aid leads to a doubling of donor projects, missions, and bureaucracy, developing country administrations will collapse under the strain. But if it leads to a doubling of partner governments' own spending on infrastructure, education, health, HIV/AIDS, and social safety nets, we can be optimistic about achieving the MDGs.",
author = "Sam Sharpe and Adrian Wood and Ellen Wratten",
year = "2005",
month = "9",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
pages = "36--38",
journal = "Finance and Development",
issn = "0145-1707",
publisher = "International Monetary Fund",

}

Sharpe, S, Wood, A & Wratten, E 2005, 'U.K. More Country Ownership' Finance and Development, vol. 42, no. 3, pp. 36-38.

U.K. More Country Ownership. / Sharpe, Sam; Wood, Adrian; Wratten, Ellen.

In: Finance and Development, Vol. 42, No. 3, 09.2005, p. 36-38.

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

TY - GEN

T1 - U.K.

T2 - Finance and Development

AU - Sharpe, Sam

AU - Wood, Adrian

AU - Wratten, Ellen

PY - 2005/9

Y1 - 2005/9

N2 - In 2005, the UN Millennium Project recommended a doubling of aid flows worldwide from their recent levels of $60 billion per year. The Commission for Africa called for a doubling of aid to Africa over the next three to five years, and the Gleneagles G8 summit committed the major donors to achieving this target. But the impact of such increases in aid on world poverty will depend crucially on how they are spent. If a doubling of aid leads to a doubling of donor projects, missions, and bureaucracy, developing country administrations will collapse under the strain. But if it leads to a doubling of partner governments' own spending on infrastructure, education, health, HIV/AIDS, and social safety nets, we can be optimistic about achieving the MDGs.

AB - In 2005, the UN Millennium Project recommended a doubling of aid flows worldwide from their recent levels of $60 billion per year. The Commission for Africa called for a doubling of aid to Africa over the next three to five years, and the Gleneagles G8 summit committed the major donors to achieving this target. But the impact of such increases in aid on world poverty will depend crucially on how they are spent. If a doubling of aid leads to a doubling of donor projects, missions, and bureaucracy, developing country administrations will collapse under the strain. But if it leads to a doubling of partner governments' own spending on infrastructure, education, health, HIV/AIDS, and social safety nets, we can be optimistic about achieving the MDGs.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=27944488783&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 42

SP - 36

EP - 38

JO - Finance and Development

JF - Finance and Development

SN - 0145-1707

ER -

Sharpe S, Wood A, Wratten E. U.K. More Country Ownership. Finance and Development. 2005 Sep;42(3):36-38.