Understanding the current sexual health service provision for mental health consumers by nurses in mental health settings: Findings from a Survey in Australia and England

Chris Quinn, Chris Platania-Phung, Christopher Bale, Brenda Happell, Elizabeth Hughes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nurses in mental health settings avoid talking to consumers about sexual health concerns. It is unclear whether this avoidance prevents the provision of sexual healthcare. The present study gathered information about how mental health nurses respond to sexual health issues within their routine practice, what issues they address, and their view on their role in promoting sexual health for consumers. A cross-sectional study using an electronic survey questionnaire, originally generated from a previous study in the united kingdom, was employed. The study occurred in four National Health Service Trusts in England and a national call for participants in Australia. Participants were nurse clinicians (n = 303) who self-selected by completing surveys available via email and newsletters containing links to the survey. The results demonstrated that mental health nurses do not routinely include sexual health in their practice and are poorly prepared in knowing what to do with a sexual health issue, and what services to assist consumers to use. In conclusion, it has been well established in the literature that mental health consumers experience high sexual health needs that potentially impact on health and recovery. Mental health nurses are ideally placed to promote sexual health and refer consumers to sexual health and family planning services. Training to improve the confidence and responsiveness of mental health nurses to sexual health is an urgent need.

LanguageEnglish
Pages1522-1534
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Mental Health Nursing
Volume27
Issue number5
Early online date25 Mar 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2018

Fingerprint

Reproductive Health
England
Health Services
Mental Health
Nurses
Nurse Clinicians
Surveys and Questionnaires
Health Planning
National Health Programs
Family Planning Services
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delivery of Health Care
Health

Cite this

@article{79dc4acc2eaa44cdb3de4b6594a55e2c,
title = "Understanding the current sexual health service provision for mental health consumers by nurses in mental health settings: Findings from a Survey in Australia and England",
abstract = "Nurses in mental health settings avoid talking to consumers about sexual health concerns. It is unclear whether this avoidance prevents the provision of sexual healthcare. The present study gathered information about how mental health nurses respond to sexual health issues within their routine practice, what issues they address, and their view on their role in promoting sexual health for consumers. A cross-sectional study using an electronic survey questionnaire, originally generated from a previous study in the united kingdom, was employed. The study occurred in four National Health Service Trusts in England and a national call for participants in Australia. Participants were nurse clinicians (n = 303) who self-selected by completing surveys available via email and newsletters containing links to the survey. The results demonstrated that mental health nurses do not routinely include sexual health in their practice and are poorly prepared in knowing what to do with a sexual health issue, and what services to assist consumers to use. In conclusion, it has been well established in the literature that mental health consumers experience high sexual health needs that potentially impact on health and recovery. Mental health nurses are ideally placed to promote sexual health and refer consumers to sexual health and family planning services. Training to improve the confidence and responsiveness of mental health nurses to sexual health is an urgent need.",
keywords = "mental health, nurse, sexual health",
author = "Chris Quinn and Chris Platania-Phung and Christopher Bale and Brenda Happell and Elizabeth Hughes",
year = "2018",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1111/inm.12452",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "1522--1534",
journal = "International Journal of Mental Health Nursing",
issn = "1445-8330",
publisher = "Blackwell Science Asia Pty. Ltd.",
number = "5",

}

Understanding the current sexual health service provision for mental health consumers by nurses in mental health settings : Findings from a Survey in Australia and England. / Quinn, Chris; Platania-Phung, Chris; Bale, Christopher; Happell, Brenda; Hughes, Elizabeth.

In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, Vol. 27, No. 5, 10.2018, p. 1522-1534.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Understanding the current sexual health service provision for mental health consumers by nurses in mental health settings

T2 - International Journal of Mental Health Nursing

AU - Quinn, Chris

AU - Platania-Phung, Chris

AU - Bale, Christopher

AU - Happell, Brenda

AU - Hughes, Elizabeth

PY - 2018/10

Y1 - 2018/10

N2 - Nurses in mental health settings avoid talking to consumers about sexual health concerns. It is unclear whether this avoidance prevents the provision of sexual healthcare. The present study gathered information about how mental health nurses respond to sexual health issues within their routine practice, what issues they address, and their view on their role in promoting sexual health for consumers. A cross-sectional study using an electronic survey questionnaire, originally generated from a previous study in the united kingdom, was employed. The study occurred in four National Health Service Trusts in England and a national call for participants in Australia. Participants were nurse clinicians (n = 303) who self-selected by completing surveys available via email and newsletters containing links to the survey. The results demonstrated that mental health nurses do not routinely include sexual health in their practice and are poorly prepared in knowing what to do with a sexual health issue, and what services to assist consumers to use. In conclusion, it has been well established in the literature that mental health consumers experience high sexual health needs that potentially impact on health and recovery. Mental health nurses are ideally placed to promote sexual health and refer consumers to sexual health and family planning services. Training to improve the confidence and responsiveness of mental health nurses to sexual health is an urgent need.

AB - Nurses in mental health settings avoid talking to consumers about sexual health concerns. It is unclear whether this avoidance prevents the provision of sexual healthcare. The present study gathered information about how mental health nurses respond to sexual health issues within their routine practice, what issues they address, and their view on their role in promoting sexual health for consumers. A cross-sectional study using an electronic survey questionnaire, originally generated from a previous study in the united kingdom, was employed. The study occurred in four National Health Service Trusts in England and a national call for participants in Australia. Participants were nurse clinicians (n = 303) who self-selected by completing surveys available via email and newsletters containing links to the survey. The results demonstrated that mental health nurses do not routinely include sexual health in their practice and are poorly prepared in knowing what to do with a sexual health issue, and what services to assist consumers to use. In conclusion, it has been well established in the literature that mental health consumers experience high sexual health needs that potentially impact on health and recovery. Mental health nurses are ideally placed to promote sexual health and refer consumers to sexual health and family planning services. Training to improve the confidence and responsiveness of mental health nurses to sexual health is an urgent need.

KW - mental health

KW - nurse

KW - sexual health

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85044391955&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/inm.12452

DO - 10.1111/inm.12452

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 1522

EP - 1534

JO - International Journal of Mental Health Nursing

JF - International Journal of Mental Health Nursing

SN - 1445-8330

IS - 5

ER -