Understanding Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue

John Allport, Mike Eastwood

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Abstract

Turbine housings have a difficult life. The exhaust gases passing through them may be over 700°C, whereas the surrounding air is only around 90°C giving a thermal gradient across the turbine housing walls. However, at low engine powers, the exhaust gas is much cooler giving a temperature range of 600°C during some duty cycles. It is this cycling of exhaust temperature that incurs stresses in the turbine housing, which must be carefully considered at the design stage.
LanguageEnglish
Pages3 - 4
Number of pages2
No.8
Specialist publicationHTi Magazine
PublisherCummins Turbo Technologies
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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Turbines
Fatigue of materials
Exhaust gases
Thermal gradients
Engines
Temperature
Air

Cite this

Allport, John ; Eastwood, Mike. / Understanding Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue. In: HTi Magazine. 2007 ; No. 8. pp. 3 - 4.
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Allport, J & Eastwood, M 2007, 'Understanding Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue' HTi Magazine, no. 8, pp. 3 - 4.

Understanding Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue. / Allport, John; Eastwood, Mike.

In: HTi Magazine, No. 8, 2007, p. 3 - 4.

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

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