Understanding undisturbed wound healing in clinical practice — a global survey of healthcare professionals

Phil Davies, John Stephenson, Carole Manners

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article presents data from a global survey that explored wound care professionals’ understanding of the concepts of ‘undisturbed wound healing’ and ‘dressing wear time’ and evaluated whether this understanding is related to respondents’ geographic location, profession or speciality. The type of wounds treated, typical and maximum length of time that a dressing is worn, and dressing change frequency were also explored. Knowledge about the meaning behind the two concepts was poor in almost 50% of respondents, suggesting that clinical practice and the provision of evidence-based wound healing principles vary significantly. Further investigation as to how knowledge of these concepts impacts clinical practice is warranted.
LanguageEnglish
Pages50-57
Number of pages8
JournalWounds International
Volume10
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 3 Jun 2019

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Health Care Surveys
Bandages
Wound Healing
Geographic Locations
Evidence-Based Practice
Wounds and Injuries
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

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Understanding undisturbed wound healing in clinical practice — a global survey of healthcare professionals. / Davies, Phil; Stephenson, John; Manners, Carole.

In: Wounds International, Vol. 10, No. 2, 03.06.2019, p. 50-57.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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