Uptake of the Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand perinatal mortality audit guideline

V Flenady, K Mahomed, D Ellwood, A Charles, G Teale, Y Chadha, H Jeffery, T Stacey, I Ibiebele, M Elder, Y Khong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Deficiencies in investigation and audit of perinatal deaths result in loss of information thereby limiting strategies for future prevention. The Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand (PSANZ) developed a clinical practice guideline for perinatal mortality in 2004.

Aims: To determine the current use and views of the PSANZ guideline, focussing on the investigation and audit aspects of the guideline.

Methods: A telephone survey was conducted of lead midwives and doctors working in birth suites of maternity hospitals with over 1000 births per annum in Australia and New Zealand.

Results: Sixty‐nine of the 78 eligible hospitals agreed to participate. A total of 133 clinicians were surveyed. Only 42% of clinicians surveyed were aware of the guideline; more midwives than doctors were aware (53 vs 28%). Of those, only 19% had received training in their use and 33% reported never having referred to them in practice. Implementation of even the key guideline recommendations varied. Seventy per cent of respondents reported regularly attending perinatal mortality audit meetings; midwives were less likely than doctors to attend (59 vs 81%). Almost half (45%) of those surveyed reported never receiving feedback from these meetings. The majority of clinicians surveyed agreed that all parents should be approached for consent to an autopsy examination of the baby; however, most (86%) reported the need for clinician training in counselling parents about autopsy.

Conclusions: Effective implementation programmes are urgently required to address suboptimal uptake of best practice guidelines on perinatal mortality audit in Australia and New Zealand.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)138-143
Number of pages6
JournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Volume50
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Apr 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Perinatal Mortality
Midwifery
New Zealand
Practice Guidelines
Guidelines
Autopsy
Parturition
Maternity Hospitals
Telephone
Counseling
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

Flenady, V ; Mahomed, K ; Ellwood, D ; Charles, A ; Teale, G ; Chadha, Y ; Jeffery, H ; Stacey, T ; Ibiebele, I ; Elder, M ; Khong, Y. / Uptake of the Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand perinatal mortality audit guideline. In: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. 2010 ; Vol. 50, No. 2. pp. 138-143.
@article{e8fb2f34db69491d88d06241de1f7a20,
title = "Uptake of the Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand perinatal mortality audit guideline",
abstract = "Background: Deficiencies in investigation and audit of perinatal deaths result in loss of information thereby limiting strategies for future prevention. The Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand (PSANZ) developed a clinical practice guideline for perinatal mortality in 2004.Aims: To determine the current use and views of the PSANZ guideline, focussing on the investigation and audit aspects of the guideline.Methods: A telephone survey was conducted of lead midwives and doctors working in birth suites of maternity hospitals with over 1000 births per annum in Australia and New Zealand.Results: Sixty‐nine of the 78 eligible hospitals agreed to participate. A total of 133 clinicians were surveyed. Only 42{\%} of clinicians surveyed were aware of the guideline; more midwives than doctors were aware (53 vs 28{\%}). Of those, only 19{\%} had received training in their use and 33{\%} reported never having referred to them in practice. Implementation of even the key guideline recommendations varied. Seventy per cent of respondents reported regularly attending perinatal mortality audit meetings; midwives were less likely than doctors to attend (59 vs 81{\%}). Almost half (45{\%}) of those surveyed reported never receiving feedback from these meetings. The majority of clinicians surveyed agreed that all parents should be approached for consent to an autopsy examination of the baby; however, most (86{\%}) reported the need for clinician training in counselling parents about autopsy.Conclusions: Effective implementation programmes are urgently required to address suboptimal uptake of best practice guidelines on perinatal mortality audit in Australia and New Zealand.",
author = "V Flenady and K Mahomed and D Ellwood and A Charles and G Teale and Y Chadha and H Jeffery and T Stacey and I Ibiebele and M Elder and Y Khong",
year = "2010",
month = "4",
day = "13",
doi = "10.1111/j.1479-828X.2009.01125.x",
language = "English",
volume = "50",
pages = "138--143",
journal = "Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology",
issn = "0004-8666",
publisher = "Wiley Online Library",
number = "2",

}

Flenady, V, Mahomed, K, Ellwood, D, Charles, A, Teale, G, Chadha, Y, Jeffery, H, Stacey, T, Ibiebele, I, Elder, M & Khong, Y 2010, 'Uptake of the Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand perinatal mortality audit guideline', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, vol. 50, no. 2, pp. 138-143. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1479-828X.2009.01125.x

Uptake of the Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand perinatal mortality audit guideline. / Flenady, V; Mahomed, K; Ellwood, D; Charles, A; Teale, G; Chadha, Y; Jeffery, H; Stacey, T; Ibiebele, I; Elder, M; Khong, Y.

In: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Vol. 50, No. 2, 13.04.2010, p. 138-143.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Uptake of the Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand perinatal mortality audit guideline

AU - Flenady, V

AU - Mahomed, K

AU - Ellwood, D

AU - Charles, A

AU - Teale, G

AU - Chadha, Y

AU - Jeffery, H

AU - Stacey, T

AU - Ibiebele, I

AU - Elder, M

AU - Khong, Y

PY - 2010/4/13

Y1 - 2010/4/13

N2 - Background: Deficiencies in investigation and audit of perinatal deaths result in loss of information thereby limiting strategies for future prevention. The Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand (PSANZ) developed a clinical practice guideline for perinatal mortality in 2004.Aims: To determine the current use and views of the PSANZ guideline, focussing on the investigation and audit aspects of the guideline.Methods: A telephone survey was conducted of lead midwives and doctors working in birth suites of maternity hospitals with over 1000 births per annum in Australia and New Zealand.Results: Sixty‐nine of the 78 eligible hospitals agreed to participate. A total of 133 clinicians were surveyed. Only 42% of clinicians surveyed were aware of the guideline; more midwives than doctors were aware (53 vs 28%). Of those, only 19% had received training in their use and 33% reported never having referred to them in practice. Implementation of even the key guideline recommendations varied. Seventy per cent of respondents reported regularly attending perinatal mortality audit meetings; midwives were less likely than doctors to attend (59 vs 81%). Almost half (45%) of those surveyed reported never receiving feedback from these meetings. The majority of clinicians surveyed agreed that all parents should be approached for consent to an autopsy examination of the baby; however, most (86%) reported the need for clinician training in counselling parents about autopsy.Conclusions: Effective implementation programmes are urgently required to address suboptimal uptake of best practice guidelines on perinatal mortality audit in Australia and New Zealand.

AB - Background: Deficiencies in investigation and audit of perinatal deaths result in loss of information thereby limiting strategies for future prevention. The Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand (PSANZ) developed a clinical practice guideline for perinatal mortality in 2004.Aims: To determine the current use and views of the PSANZ guideline, focussing on the investigation and audit aspects of the guideline.Methods: A telephone survey was conducted of lead midwives and doctors working in birth suites of maternity hospitals with over 1000 births per annum in Australia and New Zealand.Results: Sixty‐nine of the 78 eligible hospitals agreed to participate. A total of 133 clinicians were surveyed. Only 42% of clinicians surveyed were aware of the guideline; more midwives than doctors were aware (53 vs 28%). Of those, only 19% had received training in their use and 33% reported never having referred to them in practice. Implementation of even the key guideline recommendations varied. Seventy per cent of respondents reported regularly attending perinatal mortality audit meetings; midwives were less likely than doctors to attend (59 vs 81%). Almost half (45%) of those surveyed reported never receiving feedback from these meetings. The majority of clinicians surveyed agreed that all parents should be approached for consent to an autopsy examination of the baby; however, most (86%) reported the need for clinician training in counselling parents about autopsy.Conclusions: Effective implementation programmes are urgently required to address suboptimal uptake of best practice guidelines on perinatal mortality audit in Australia and New Zealand.

U2 - 10.1111/j.1479-828X.2009.01125.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1479-828X.2009.01125.x

M3 - Article

VL - 50

SP - 138

EP - 143

JO - Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

JF - Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

SN - 0004-8666

IS - 2

ER -