Use of a safety climate questionnaire in UK health care

Factor structure, reliability and usability

A. Hutchinson, K. L. Cooper, J. E. Dean, A. McIntosh, M. Patterson, C. B. Stride, B. E. Laurence, C. M. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: To explore the factor structure, reliability, and potential usefulness of a patient safety climate questionnaire in UK health care. Setting: Four acute hospital trusts and nine primary care trusts in England. Methods: The questionnaire used was the 27 item Teamwork and Safety Climate Survey. Thirty three healthcare staff commented on the wording and relevance. The questionnaire was then sent to 3650 staff within the 13 NHS trusts, seeking to achieve at least 600 responses as the basis for the factor analysis. 1307 questionnaires were returned (36% response). Factor analyses and reliability analyses were carried out on 897 responses from staff involved in direct patient care, to explore how consistently the questions measured the underlying constructs of safety climate and teamwork. Results: Some questionnaire items related to multiple factors or did not relate strongly to any factor. Five items were discarded. Two teamwork factors were derived from the remaining 11 teamwork items and three safety climate factors were derived from the remaining 11 safety items. Internal consistency reliabilities were satisfactory to good (Cronbach's alpha ≥0.69 for all five factors). Conclusions: This is one of the few studies to undertake a detailed evaluation of a patient safety climate questionnaire in UK health care and possibly the first to do so in primary as well as secondary care. The results indicate that a 22 item version of this safety climate questionnaire is useable as a research instrument in both settings, but also demonstrates a more general need for thorough validation of safety climate questionnaires before widespread usage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)347-353
Number of pages7
JournalQuality and Safety in Health Care
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Oct 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Climate
Delivery of Health Care
Safety
Patient Safety
Statistical Factor Analysis
Primary Health Care
Surveys and Questionnaires
Secondary Care
England
Patient Care
Research

Cite this

Hutchinson, A. ; Cooper, K. L. ; Dean, J. E. ; McIntosh, A. ; Patterson, M. ; Stride, C. B. ; Laurence, B. E. ; Smith, C. M. / Use of a safety climate questionnaire in UK health care : Factor structure, reliability and usability. In: Quality and Safety in Health Care. 2006 ; Vol. 15, No. 5. pp. 347-353.
@article{14f07e886e714ae3847e0574de591e5e,
title = "Use of a safety climate questionnaire in UK health care: Factor structure, reliability and usability",
abstract = "Aim: To explore the factor structure, reliability, and potential usefulness of a patient safety climate questionnaire in UK health care. Setting: Four acute hospital trusts and nine primary care trusts in England. Methods: The questionnaire used was the 27 item Teamwork and Safety Climate Survey. Thirty three healthcare staff commented on the wording and relevance. The questionnaire was then sent to 3650 staff within the 13 NHS trusts, seeking to achieve at least 600 responses as the basis for the factor analysis. 1307 questionnaires were returned (36{\%} response). Factor analyses and reliability analyses were carried out on 897 responses from staff involved in direct patient care, to explore how consistently the questions measured the underlying constructs of safety climate and teamwork. Results: Some questionnaire items related to multiple factors or did not relate strongly to any factor. Five items were discarded. Two teamwork factors were derived from the remaining 11 teamwork items and three safety climate factors were derived from the remaining 11 safety items. Internal consistency reliabilities were satisfactory to good (Cronbach's alpha ≥0.69 for all five factors). Conclusions: This is one of the few studies to undertake a detailed evaluation of a patient safety climate questionnaire in UK health care and possibly the first to do so in primary as well as secondary care. The results indicate that a 22 item version of this safety climate questionnaire is useable as a research instrument in both settings, but also demonstrates a more general need for thorough validation of safety climate questionnaires before widespread usage.",
author = "A. Hutchinson and Cooper, {K. L.} and Dean, {J. E.} and A. McIntosh and M. Patterson and Stride, {C. B.} and Laurence, {B. E.} and Smith, {C. M.}",
year = "2006",
month = "10",
day = "30",
doi = "10.1136/qshc.2005.016584",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "347--353",
journal = "BMJ Quality and Safety",
issn = "2044-5415",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group Ltd",
number = "5",

}

Hutchinson, A, Cooper, KL, Dean, JE, McIntosh, A, Patterson, M, Stride, CB, Laurence, BE & Smith, CM 2006, 'Use of a safety climate questionnaire in UK health care: Factor structure, reliability and usability', Quality and Safety in Health Care, vol. 15, no. 5, pp. 347-353. https://doi.org/10.1136/qshc.2005.016584

Use of a safety climate questionnaire in UK health care : Factor structure, reliability and usability. / Hutchinson, A.; Cooper, K. L.; Dean, J. E.; McIntosh, A.; Patterson, M.; Stride, C. B.; Laurence, B. E.; Smith, C. M.

In: Quality and Safety in Health Care, Vol. 15, No. 5, 30.10.2006, p. 347-353.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Use of a safety climate questionnaire in UK health care

T2 - Factor structure, reliability and usability

AU - Hutchinson, A.

AU - Cooper, K. L.

AU - Dean, J. E.

AU - McIntosh, A.

AU - Patterson, M.

AU - Stride, C. B.

AU - Laurence, B. E.

AU - Smith, C. M.

PY - 2006/10/30

Y1 - 2006/10/30

N2 - Aim: To explore the factor structure, reliability, and potential usefulness of a patient safety climate questionnaire in UK health care. Setting: Four acute hospital trusts and nine primary care trusts in England. Methods: The questionnaire used was the 27 item Teamwork and Safety Climate Survey. Thirty three healthcare staff commented on the wording and relevance. The questionnaire was then sent to 3650 staff within the 13 NHS trusts, seeking to achieve at least 600 responses as the basis for the factor analysis. 1307 questionnaires were returned (36% response). Factor analyses and reliability analyses were carried out on 897 responses from staff involved in direct patient care, to explore how consistently the questions measured the underlying constructs of safety climate and teamwork. Results: Some questionnaire items related to multiple factors or did not relate strongly to any factor. Five items were discarded. Two teamwork factors were derived from the remaining 11 teamwork items and three safety climate factors were derived from the remaining 11 safety items. Internal consistency reliabilities were satisfactory to good (Cronbach's alpha ≥0.69 for all five factors). Conclusions: This is one of the few studies to undertake a detailed evaluation of a patient safety climate questionnaire in UK health care and possibly the first to do so in primary as well as secondary care. The results indicate that a 22 item version of this safety climate questionnaire is useable as a research instrument in both settings, but also demonstrates a more general need for thorough validation of safety climate questionnaires before widespread usage.

AB - Aim: To explore the factor structure, reliability, and potential usefulness of a patient safety climate questionnaire in UK health care. Setting: Four acute hospital trusts and nine primary care trusts in England. Methods: The questionnaire used was the 27 item Teamwork and Safety Climate Survey. Thirty three healthcare staff commented on the wording and relevance. The questionnaire was then sent to 3650 staff within the 13 NHS trusts, seeking to achieve at least 600 responses as the basis for the factor analysis. 1307 questionnaires were returned (36% response). Factor analyses and reliability analyses were carried out on 897 responses from staff involved in direct patient care, to explore how consistently the questions measured the underlying constructs of safety climate and teamwork. Results: Some questionnaire items related to multiple factors or did not relate strongly to any factor. Five items were discarded. Two teamwork factors were derived from the remaining 11 teamwork items and three safety climate factors were derived from the remaining 11 safety items. Internal consistency reliabilities were satisfactory to good (Cronbach's alpha ≥0.69 for all five factors). Conclusions: This is one of the few studies to undertake a detailed evaluation of a patient safety climate questionnaire in UK health care and possibly the first to do so in primary as well as secondary care. The results indicate that a 22 item version of this safety climate questionnaire is useable as a research instrument in both settings, but also demonstrates a more general need for thorough validation of safety climate questionnaires before widespread usage.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33751254408&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/qshc.2005.016584

DO - 10.1136/qshc.2005.016584

M3 - Review article

VL - 15

SP - 347

EP - 353

JO - BMJ Quality and Safety

JF - BMJ Quality and Safety

SN - 2044-5415

IS - 5

ER -