7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Faecal incontinence is a potentially complex patient issue that poses a real challenge to healthcare professionals and requires careful and effective assessment and prevention strategies to protect the viability of the skin. This paper explores preliminary results of an observational study undertaken by the authors in an intensive therapy unit. Data highlighted that faecal incontinence can damage the skin's integrity, leading to skin breakdown and possible wound contamination, giving rise to major healthcare costs. To prevent this, faecal collection systems can be used as an effective early intervention. The study mentioned in this article, identified that clinical staff associated a high skin risk assessment score with the need to use a faecal collection device.

LanguageEnglish
Pages86-91
Number of pages6
JournalWounds UK
Volume6
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2010

Fingerprint

Fecal Incontinence
Skin
Wounds and Injuries
Health Care Costs
Observational Studies
Delivery of Health Care
Equipment and Supplies
Therapeutics

Cite this

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title = "Using faecal collectors to reduce wound contamination",
abstract = "Faecal incontinence is a potentially complex patient issue that poses a real challenge to healthcare professionals and requires careful and effective assessment and prevention strategies to protect the viability of the skin. This paper explores preliminary results of an observational study undertaken by the authors in an intensive therapy unit. Data highlighted that faecal incontinence can damage the skin's integrity, leading to skin breakdown and possible wound contamination, giving rise to major healthcare costs. To prevent this, faecal collection systems can be used as an effective early intervention. The study mentioned in this article, identified that clinical staff associated a high skin risk assessment score with the need to use a faecal collection device.",
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Using faecal collectors to reduce wound contamination. / Ousey, Karen; Gillibrand, Warren.

In: Wounds UK, Vol. 6, No. 1, 01.03.2010, p. 86-91.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Using faecal collectors to reduce wound contamination

AU - Ousey, Karen

AU - Gillibrand, Warren

PY - 2010/3/1

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N2 - Faecal incontinence is a potentially complex patient issue that poses a real challenge to healthcare professionals and requires careful and effective assessment and prevention strategies to protect the viability of the skin. This paper explores preliminary results of an observational study undertaken by the authors in an intensive therapy unit. Data highlighted that faecal incontinence can damage the skin's integrity, leading to skin breakdown and possible wound contamination, giving rise to major healthcare costs. To prevent this, faecal collection systems can be used as an effective early intervention. The study mentioned in this article, identified that clinical staff associated a high skin risk assessment score with the need to use a faecal collection device.

AB - Faecal incontinence is a potentially complex patient issue that poses a real challenge to healthcare professionals and requires careful and effective assessment and prevention strategies to protect the viability of the skin. This paper explores preliminary results of an observational study undertaken by the authors in an intensive therapy unit. Data highlighted that faecal incontinence can damage the skin's integrity, leading to skin breakdown and possible wound contamination, giving rise to major healthcare costs. To prevent this, faecal collection systems can be used as an effective early intervention. The study mentioned in this article, identified that clinical staff associated a high skin risk assessment score with the need to use a faecal collection device.

KW - Faecal incontinence

KW - Faecal management-systems

KW - Waterlow

KW - Wound contamination

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UR - http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/7198/

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