Using photo-elicitation to understand reasons for repeated self-harm: a qualitative study

Amanda Edmondson, Cathy Brennan, Allan House

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Abstract

Background: Reasons for self-harm are not well understood. One of the reasons for this is that first-hand accounts are usually elicited using traditional interview and questionnaire methods. This study aims to explore the acceptability of using an approach (photo-elicitation) that does not rely on solely verbal or written techniques, and to make a preliminary assessment of whether people can usefully employ images to support a discussion about the reasons why they self-harm.
Method: Interviews with eight participants using photo elicitation, a method in which photographs produced by the participant are used as a stimulus and guide within the interview.
Results: Participants responded positively to using images to support a discussion about their self-harm and readily incorporated images in the interview. Four main themes were identified representing negative and positive or adaptive purposes of self-harm: self-harm as a response to distress, self-harm to achieve mastery, self-harm as protective and self-harm as a language or form of communication.
Conclusions: Employing this novel approach was useful in broadening our understanding of self-harm.
LanguageEnglish
Article number98
Number of pages11
JournalBMC Psychiatry
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Apr 2018

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abstract = "Background: Reasons for self-harm are not well understood. One of the reasons for this is that first-hand accounts are usually elicited using traditional interview and questionnaire methods. This study aims to explore the acceptability of using an approach (photo-elicitation) that does not rely on solely verbal or written techniques, and to make a preliminary assessment of whether people can usefully employ images to support a discussion about the reasons why they self-harm. Method: Interviews with eight participants using photo elicitation, a method in which photographs produced by the participant are used as a stimulus and guide within the interview. Results: Participants responded positively to using images to support a discussion about their self-harm and readily incorporated images in the interview. Four main themes were identified representing negative and positive or adaptive purposes of self-harm: self-harm as a response to distress, self-harm to achieve mastery, self-harm as protective and self-harm as a language or form of communication.Conclusions: Employing this novel approach was useful in broadening our understanding of self-harm.",
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Using photo-elicitation to understand reasons for repeated self-harm : a qualitative study. / Edmondson, Amanda; Brennan, Cathy; House, Allan .

In: BMC Psychiatry, Vol. 18, No. 1, 98, 11.04.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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