Using single use negative pressure wound therapy for patients with complicated diabetic foot ulcers: an economic perspective

Andrew Sharpe, David Myers, Richard Searle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This case series aims to give insight into the impact of single-use Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) (PICO 7) on improving service delivery to patients with complicated diabetic foot ulcers in a UK NHS Trust. Method: Service delivery was modified to utilise the new features available on the single-use NPWT (PICO 7) device. The features of the device and how to use it was explained and demonstrated to all patients and carers involved in the case series. As part of normal, best practice, advice and guidance on deteriorating characteristics of an ulcer as well as emergency symptoms, such as spreading infection, were given. Patients were also given all relevant services’ contact details. Discussion/results: Four DFU patients were included in this case series. In all cases, the adoption of single-use NPWT resulted in changes to the treatment pathway, leading to improved efficiency. Patients or their carers were able to self-assess the dressing’s status by use of the dressing-full indicator. Contact by phone determined the need for an outpatient clinic visit or a district nurse visit. Consequently, patients only had to attend out-patient clinics when necessary and dressings were only changed when needed. This gave economic benefits associated with a reduced frequency of out-patient clinic visits of 1 to 2 per patient over the treatment period and a reduction in the frequency of district nurse visits from 3–4/week to 1–2/week. Over a 12-week treatment period, this could deliver clinical time and cost savings. Conclusion: Utilisation of the single-use NPWT device gives the potential to improve service delivery in patients with complicated DFUs and infers efficiency savings.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)89-93
Number of pages5
JournalWounds UK
Volume14
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 19 Sep 2018

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