Value Neutrality

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingEntry for encyclopedia/dictionary

Abstract

The discipline of psychology has built its reputation on its success in modeling itself upon the natural sciences. This vision of psychology makes the assumption that its theories and methods are objective and value neutral and that our enquiries about the world are free from prior assumptions, vested interests, and subjective interpretations. From the perspective of critical psychology, however, the discipline may be seen as explicitly and, more often, implicitly driven by people or groups with vested interests. Objectivity and value neutrality themselves may be unattainable, and even undesirable, in principle. Value neutrality thus becomes reframed as a potentially dangerous phantasm and psychologists must therefore consider its implications for research and practice.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEncyclopedia of Critical Psychology
EditorsThomas Teo
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages2043-2045
Number of pages3
ISBN (Electronic)9781461455837
ISBN (Print)9781461455820
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Burr, V. (2014). Value Neutrality. In T. Teo (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Critical Psychology (pp. 2043-2045). [Chapter 326] Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5583-7_326
Burr, Vivien. / Value Neutrality. Encyclopedia of Critical Psychology. editor / Thomas Teo. Springer New York, 2014. pp. 2043-2045
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Burr, V 2014, Value Neutrality. in T Teo (ed.), Encyclopedia of Critical Psychology., Chapter 326, Springer New York, pp. 2043-2045. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5583-7_326

Value Neutrality. / Burr, Vivien.

Encyclopedia of Critical Psychology. ed. / Thomas Teo. Springer New York, 2014. p. 2043-2045 Chapter 326.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingEntry for encyclopedia/dictionary

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Burr V. Value Neutrality. In Teo T, editor, Encyclopedia of Critical Psychology. Springer New York. 2014. p. 2043-2045. Chapter 326 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5583-7_326