Went Fundholding, Going Commissioning?

Some Evidence-Based Reflections on the Prospects for Primary Care Groups

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Abstract

Following the publication of the White Paper, 'The New NHS: Modern, Dependable' (Cm 3807), the Labour Government has abolished GP fundholding. Family doctors retain a lead role for primary care in planning health care with the creation of Primary Care Groups (PCGs). In due course, it is expected that health authorities will relinquish direct commissioning of care to PCGs. Although fundholding is ending, its operation provides useful evidence about how GPs approach participation in the planning of health care. This article reflects on the prospects for PCGs, drawing on original research into the reasons why practices volunteered to 'go fundholding' and how those practices selected their 'lead' partner, on whom much of the fundholding burden fell
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33-37
Number of pages5
JournalPublic Money and Management
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999

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Group
health care
planning
Evidence-based
Primary care
Fundholding
labor
participation
health
Planning
Healthcare
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Health
Labor
Participation
Doctors
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Cite this

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title = "Went Fundholding, Going Commissioning?: Some Evidence-Based Reflections on the Prospects for Primary Care Groups",
abstract = "Following the publication of the White Paper, 'The New NHS: Modern, Dependable' (Cm 3807), the Labour Government has abolished GP fundholding. Family doctors retain a lead role for primary care in planning health care with the creation of Primary Care Groups (PCGs). In due course, it is expected that health authorities will relinquish direct commissioning of care to PCGs. Although fundholding is ending, its operation provides useful evidence about how GPs approach participation in the planning of health care. This article reflects on the prospects for PCGs, drawing on original research into the reasons why practices volunteered to 'go fundholding' and how those practices selected their 'lead' partner, on whom much of the fundholding burden fell",
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AB - Following the publication of the White Paper, 'The New NHS: Modern, Dependable' (Cm 3807), the Labour Government has abolished GP fundholding. Family doctors retain a lead role for primary care in planning health care with the creation of Primary Care Groups (PCGs). In due course, it is expected that health authorities will relinquish direct commissioning of care to PCGs. Although fundholding is ending, its operation provides useful evidence about how GPs approach participation in the planning of health care. This article reflects on the prospects for PCGs, drawing on original research into the reasons why practices volunteered to 'go fundholding' and how those practices selected their 'lead' partner, on whom much of the fundholding burden fell

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