What about my dad? Black fathers and the child protection system

Anna Gupta, Brid Featherstone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article explores social work practice with black fathers within the child protection and family court systems through the analysis of case studies involving black fathers whose children ‘nearly missed’ the chance to live with them. Drawing upon theories of social justice this paper explores the construction of black men as fathers and contextualises the discussion in relation to gender, race, poverty and immigration issues, as well as the current policy and legal context of child protection work in England. The article examines how beliefs and assumptions about black men can influence how they are constructed, and subsequent decision-making processes. The paper concludes with some suggestions for critical social work practice within a human rights and social justice framework

LanguageEnglish
Pages77-91
Number of pages15
JournalCritical and Radical Social Work
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2016

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child protection
father
social justice
social work
family court
decision-making process
immigration
human rights
poverty
gender

Cite this

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What about my dad? Black fathers and the child protection system. / Gupta, Anna; Featherstone, Brid.

In: Critical and Radical Social Work, Vol. 4, No. 1, 01.03.2016, p. 77-91.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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