What do we document?: Dense video and the epistemology of practice

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Much recent thinking about performance documentation has coalesced around an apparent opposition between the relative stability of the document and the ontological ephemerality of the live event. Indeed, if we begin from the problem of translating a singular and ephemeral event into a stable document, then failure is guaranteed from the start. Understood as an inherently transient moment, performance “cannot be saved, documented, or otherwise participate in the circulation of representations of representations: once it does so, it becomes something other than performance” (Phelan 1993: 146). But the problem of documentation is illusory insofar as the performing arts have no special claim to ephemerality. As I have argued elsewhere, it is not performance but life in general — the world, the real, being itself — that escapes documentary capture (Spatz 2015a: 234). In fact, the questions faced by a documentarian are not entirely different to those faced by a director or choreographer who works through the craft of composition to condense various embodied and dramaturgical materials into a repeatable performance score. Nor do the spectators who attend such a performance necessarily have better or more direct access to the underlying processes that gave rise to it than do those who encounter the work through written or recorded documents. Understood in this way, documentation poses not the insoluble problem of grasping the ungraspable but rather the concrete challenge of isolating and articulating those aspects of a practice that can be shared and transmitted through the available tools. As the tools change, the potential for sharing and transmission also changes.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationDocumenting Performance
Subtitle of host publicationThe Context and Processes of Digital Curation and Archiving
EditorsToni Sant
PublisherBloomsbury Publishing
Pages241-252
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9781472588197
ISBN (Print)9781472588180, 9781472588173
Publication statusPublished - 23 Mar 2017

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Epistemology
Documentation
Ephemerality
Choreographers
Spectator
Ontological
Ephemeral
Translating
Documentary
Performing Arts

Cite this

Spatz, B. (2017). What do we document? Dense video and the epistemology of practice. In T. Sant (Ed.), Documenting Performance: The Context and Processes of Digital Curation and Archiving (pp. 241-252). Bloomsbury Publishing.
Spatz, Ben. / What do we document? Dense video and the epistemology of practice. Documenting Performance: The Context and Processes of Digital Curation and Archiving. editor / Toni Sant. Bloomsbury Publishing, 2017. pp. 241-252
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Spatz, B 2017, What do we document? Dense video and the epistemology of practice. in T Sant (ed.), Documenting Performance: The Context and Processes of Digital Curation and Archiving. Bloomsbury Publishing, pp. 241-252.

What do we document? Dense video and the epistemology of practice. / Spatz, Ben.

Documenting Performance: The Context and Processes of Digital Curation and Archiving. ed. / Toni Sant. Bloomsbury Publishing, 2017. p. 241-252.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Spatz B. What do we document? Dense video and the epistemology of practice. In Sant T, editor, Documenting Performance: The Context and Processes of Digital Curation and Archiving. Bloomsbury Publishing. 2017. p. 241-252