Who stands to gain from union-led learning in Britain? Evidence from surveys of learners, union officers and employers

Mark Stuart, Jo Cutter, Hugh Cook, Jonathan Winterton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article considers the potential gains which the union-led learning agenda may provide for its various stakeholders in Britain. To do this, it draws on extensive surveys of individual learners, trade union workers and employers to evaluate the extent of possible gains. The article argues that the union-led learning agenda may open a new and novel channel for unions to develop voice around learning at the workplace within a liberal market environment. The findings show that purported gains have been realized by all parties, but suggest that any notion of mutuality is dependent on the workplace structures of voice and codification that unions are looking to build around learning, such as learning agreements.

LanguageEnglish
Pages227-246
Number of pages20
JournalEconomic and Industrial Democracy
Volume34
Issue number2
Early online date19 Apr 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Who stands to gain from union-led learning in Britain? Evidence from surveys of learners, union officers and employers. / Stuart, Mark; Cutter, Jo; Cook, Hugh; Winterton, Jonathan.

In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Vol. 34, No. 2, 01.05.2013, p. 227-246.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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