Why Gender Matters for Every Child Matters

Brigid Daniel, Brid Featherstone, Carol Ann Hooper, Jonathan Scourfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article is a commentary on the Green Paper for children's services in England: Every Child Matters. The focus of the discussion is the lack of gender analysis in the document. The article highlights the gendered character of contemporary parenting, and the failure of some of the proposals in the Green Paper to address this. There is also discussion of the need to appreciate the gendered character of childhood, and the implications of this for children's services. The authors also argue the importance of using a gendered perspective to engage adequately with the causes and consequences of child maltreatment. The article ends with some recommendations for strengthening the gender analysis in the Green Paper.

LanguageEnglish
Pages1343-1355
Number of pages13
JournalBritish Journal of Social Work
Volume35
Issue number8
Early online date26 Sep 2005
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2005

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gender
maltreatment of children
Child Abuse
Parenting
England
childhood
cause
lack

Cite this

Daniel, Brigid ; Featherstone, Brid ; Hooper, Carol Ann ; Scourfield, Jonathan. / Why Gender Matters for Every Child Matters. In: British Journal of Social Work. 2005 ; Vol. 35, No. 8. pp. 1343-1355.
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Why Gender Matters for Every Child Matters. / Daniel, Brigid; Featherstone, Brid; Hooper, Carol Ann; Scourfield, Jonathan.

In: British Journal of Social Work, Vol. 35, No. 8, 01.12.2005, p. 1343-1355.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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