Widening provision in higher education - some non-traditional participants’ experiences

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Higher education is usually the preserve of the white, able-bodied, middle classes. This paper reports on the experience of the participants in a project designed to challenge this by givingaccess to working-class, black and disabled community activists to the degree in communityeducation. It identifies the institutional and dispositional barriers to access to higher educationand to sustained participation, and shows how the project has overcome many of them usingillustrations from the participants’ experiences. In particular, their school and later learningexperiences and attitudes to higher education and the factors that helped them to stay on theircourse, are discussed. It makes suggestions for the ways in which higher education mightbecome more accessible, based on these findings, at both an institutional and an individuallevel.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)107-119
Number of pages13
JournalResearch Papers in Education
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

education
experience
working class
middle class
participation
school
community

Cite this

@article{8f21510c8a0e4f5bb867c8e6bbb6d078,
title = "Widening provision in higher education - some non-traditional participants’ experiences",
abstract = "Higher education is usually the preserve of the white, able-bodied, middle classes. This paper reports on the experience of the participants in a project designed to challenge this by givingaccess to working-class, black and disabled community activists to the degree in communityeducation. It identifies the institutional and dispositional barriers to access to higher educationand to sustained participation, and shows how the project has overcome many of them usingillustrations from the participants’ experiences. In particular, their school and later learningexperiences and attitudes to higher education and the factors that helped them to stay on theircourse, are discussed. It makes suggestions for the ways in which higher education mightbecome more accessible, based on these findings, at both an institutional and an individuallevel.",
keywords = "Access, Adults, Community, Higher education, Participation, Working-class",
author = "Lyn Tett",
year = "1999",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/0267152990140107",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "107--119",
journal = "Research Papers in Education",
issn = "0267-1522",
publisher = "N F E R Nelson Publishing Limited",
number = "1",

}

Widening provision in higher education - some non-traditional participants’ experiences. / Tett, Lyn.

In: Research Papers in Education, Vol. 14, No. 1, 01.03.1999, p. 107-119.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Widening provision in higher education - some non-traditional participants’ experiences

AU - Tett, Lyn

PY - 1999/3/1

Y1 - 1999/3/1

N2 - Higher education is usually the preserve of the white, able-bodied, middle classes. This paper reports on the experience of the participants in a project designed to challenge this by givingaccess to working-class, black and disabled community activists to the degree in communityeducation. It identifies the institutional and dispositional barriers to access to higher educationand to sustained participation, and shows how the project has overcome many of them usingillustrations from the participants’ experiences. In particular, their school and later learningexperiences and attitudes to higher education and the factors that helped them to stay on theircourse, are discussed. It makes suggestions for the ways in which higher education mightbecome more accessible, based on these findings, at both an institutional and an individuallevel.

AB - Higher education is usually the preserve of the white, able-bodied, middle classes. This paper reports on the experience of the participants in a project designed to challenge this by givingaccess to working-class, black and disabled community activists to the degree in communityeducation. It identifies the institutional and dispositional barriers to access to higher educationand to sustained participation, and shows how the project has overcome many of them usingillustrations from the participants’ experiences. In particular, their school and later learningexperiences and attitudes to higher education and the factors that helped them to stay on theircourse, are discussed. It makes suggestions for the ways in which higher education mightbecome more accessible, based on these findings, at both an institutional and an individuallevel.

KW - Access

KW - Adults

KW - Community

KW - Higher education

KW - Participation

KW - Working-class

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0006240346&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/0267152990140107

DO - 10.1080/0267152990140107

M3 - Article

VL - 14

SP - 107

EP - 119

JO - Research Papers in Education

JF - Research Papers in Education

SN - 0267-1522

IS - 1

ER -