Women's knowledge of and attitude towards disability in rural Nepal

Padam P. Simkhada, Deepson Shyangdan, Edwin R. Van Teijlingen, Santosh Kadel, Jane Stephen, Tara Gurung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: What is perceived to be a disability is both culturally specific and related to levels of development and modernity. This paper explores knowledge and attitudes towards people with disabilities among rural women in Nepal, one of the poorer countries in South Asia. Method: Four hundred and twelve married women of reproductive age (aged 15-49 years), from four villages in two different parts of Nepal, who had delivered a child within the last 24 months preceding the study, completed a standard questionnaire. Results: The majority of the participants only considered physical conditions that limit function of an individual and are visible to naked eyes, such as missing a leg or arm, to be disability. Attitudes towards people with disability were generally positive, for example most women believed that disabled people should have equal rights and should be allowed to sit on committees or get married. Most respondents thought that disability could result from: (i) accidents; (ii) medical conditions; or (iii) genetic inheritance. Fewer women thought that disability was caused by fate or bad spirits. Conclusions: There is need to educate the general population on disability, especially the invisible disabilities. There is also a need for further research on disability and its social impact. Implications for Rehabilitation There is need to educate the general population on disability, especially the invisible disabilities and its rehabilitation. There is also a need for further research on disability and its social impact.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)606-613
Number of pages8
JournalDisability and Rehabilitation
Volume35
Issue number7
Early online date23 Jul 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Nepal
Disabled Persons
Social Change
Rehabilitation
Research
Population
Accidents
Leg
Arm
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

Simkhada, P. P., Shyangdan, D., Van Teijlingen, E. R., Kadel, S., Stephen, J., & Gurung, T. (2013). Women's knowledge of and attitude towards disability in rural Nepal. Disability and Rehabilitation, 35(7), 606-613. https://doi.org/10.3109/09638288.2012.702847
Simkhada, Padam P. ; Shyangdan, Deepson ; Van Teijlingen, Edwin R. ; Kadel, Santosh ; Stephen, Jane ; Gurung, Tara. / Women's knowledge of and attitude towards disability in rural Nepal. In: Disability and Rehabilitation. 2013 ; Vol. 35, No. 7. pp. 606-613.
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Simkhada, PP, Shyangdan, D, Van Teijlingen, ER, Kadel, S, Stephen, J & Gurung, T 2013, 'Women's knowledge of and attitude towards disability in rural Nepal', Disability and Rehabilitation, vol. 35, no. 7, pp. 606-613. https://doi.org/10.3109/09638288.2012.702847

Women's knowledge of and attitude towards disability in rural Nepal. / Simkhada, Padam P.; Shyangdan, Deepson; Van Teijlingen, Edwin R.; Kadel, Santosh; Stephen, Jane; Gurung, Tara.

In: Disability and Rehabilitation, Vol. 35, No. 7, 01.01.2013, p. 606-613.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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