“You can’t Cure it so you have to Endure it”

The Experience of Adaptation to Diabetic Renal Disease

Nigel King, Carmen Carroll, Peggy Newton, Tim Dornan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, the experience of adaptation to diabetic renal disease was examined from a phenomenological perspective. Twenty patients attending a diabetic renal clinic were interviewed in depth. Through the use of a template analysis approach, a set of strong themes relating to changes in lifestyle was identified: clianges in the nature of involvement with the medical system, coping strategies, and hopes, fears, and expectations. Almost all participants attempted to construct a "good adaptation" in the face of the uncertainties surrounding their condition by adopting a stoic and fatalistic stance. This is discussed in the context of the claim that contemporary society holds emotional self-expression rather than stoical endurance to be the appropriate response to suffering.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)329-346
Number of pages18
JournalQualitative Health Research
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2002

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Hope
Kidney
Psychological Stress
Uncertainty
Fear
Life Style

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“You can’t Cure it so you have to Endure it” : The Experience of Adaptation to Diabetic Renal Disease. / King, Nigel; Carroll, Carmen; Newton, Peggy; Dornan, Tim.

In: Qualitative Health Research, Vol. 12, No. 3, 01.03.2002, p. 329-346.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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